Exfoliation and your skin

Exfoliation and your skin

Exfoliation and your skin

Skin exfoliation has many different benefits for your skin and it may be the perfect addition to your weekly beauty routine. What is exfoliation, how do you exfoliate and what benefits may exfoliation bring to your skin health? We explore all these below.

What is exfoliation?

Exfoliation is the process where dead or dry skin cells are removed from the top layer of the skin making use of either chemical exfoliation or manual exfoliation. Chemical exfoliants are ingredients in skincare products that are created specifically for the purpose of exfoliation of the skin - ingredients such as bet hydroxy acid (salicylic acid) or glycolic acid for example, and generally done by a dermatologist. Manual exfoliation is where a product such as a skin buffer or a product with actual bead-like properties are massaged into the skin (usually in circular motions) to help remove dead or dry skin cells from the surface of the skin. This process may also stimulate bloodflow.

What are the possible benefits of exfoliation?

There are many possible benefits of skin exfoliation. Exfoliating the skin is a wonderful technique to incorporate into your skincare routine, as a person may enjoy the physical process of “pampering” themselves once or twice a week with an exfoliating face mask, or exfoliation “session.” Exfoliating the skin manually may stimulate blood flow under the skin's surface which in turn could promote a healthy glowing skin. Exfoliation may also help to remove clogged pores and remove dead skin cells from the skin's surface, and may stimulate collagen production., Because exfoliation may stimulate collagen production, there is the possibility that exfoliation may therefore play a role in reducing signs of aging such as fine lines and wrinkles, and in helping to improve uneven skin tone.

Can all skin types exfoliate?

The answer is mostly yes. Most skin types should be able to exfoliate their skin, but they may need to use different methods of skin exfoliation.

Oily skin types

A person with an oily skin type may benefit by exfoliating every other day to help with grime settling into the pores.

Sensitive skin types

A person with a sensitive skin type would need to approach skin exfoliation with caution as excessive or abrasive exfoliation methods may do more harm than good. A gentle chemical exfoliator could be more suitable for a person with a sensitive skin type, or a manual exfoliation that is oat based.

Dry or combination skin types

A person with a dry or combination skin type, could also look for a gentler method for removing dead skin cells. These skin types could benefit from a chemical exfoliator that is tailored to their specific needs, or manual exfoliating once or twice a week.

Normal skin types

A normal skin type is likely the most tolerable when it comes to exfoliation methods. A person with a normal skin could possibly make use of a physical exfoliant as well as a chemical exfoliant.

How often should you exfoliate?

Typically, skin exfoliation could be incorporated into your skincare routine twice or three times a week - depending on your specific skin type of course. The type of exfoliation methods you use will also depict how often you exfoliate. Manual exfoliation should typically be done less often, whereas chemical exfoliation can usually be done more frequently, based on what your dermatologist suggests. There are some skin care products available that function as a cleanser as well as an exfoliant - this type of exfoliating cleanser will likely be able to be used every day as it should be gentle enough for that purpose.

What exfoliation products should you use?

The exfoliation products you use will depend largely on your skin type, your budget and what products are accessible to you. At SeraLabs we love skin care products that are created with clinically backed ingredients. The Seratopical Exfoliating Polish & Cleanser is a powerful purifying cocktail of Micro-powder, Hyaluronic Acid and Fruit Extracts that serves as both a skin exfoliation and cleanser for day to day use. This Polish & Cleanser also helps to maintain the delicate moisture balance thanks to the addition of the hydrating properties of Hyaluronic Acid.

Beta hydroxy acids vs alpha hydroxy acids

Beta hydroxy acids and alpha hydroxy acids or BHA and AHA are both chemical forms of exfoliation. The difference between BHA and AHA is that alpha hydroxy acids are water soluble and beta hydroxy acids are known to be oil soluble. Alpha hydroxy acids are usually more suited for sensitive skin types; however, caution should always be taken when making use of any new product. Beta hydroxy acids may penetrate deeper into the skin's surface to exfoliate at a deeper level, and you should always refer to a dermatologist before using this method.

Why should you remove dead skin cells?

Dead skin cells occur naturally during the skin turnover process where your skin is constantly creating new skin cells to replace older, or “dead” cells. If these dead cells aren't removed effectively from the skin, over time they may 'build up' on the skin's surface, which may lead to blocked or clogged pores, or dull looking skin. . A skincare routine that incorporates proper exfoliation may help to remove these dead skin cells faster than the natural process. Exfoliation may speed up this skin turnover process, and an improved skin turnover process may also lead to an improved collagen stimulating process. When you exfoliate your skin, and remove the dead skin cells, you may reveal radiant skin that lies just underneath the surface of dead skin.

Seratopical Exfoliating Polish & Cleanser

Helping to combat the daily environmental effects on the skin by helping to remove excess oil, dead skin and build up from the skin's surface, this gentle micropowder, purifying cleanser and exfoliator from SeraLabs, with clinically backed ingredients, will help to keep your skin looking fresh and hydrated. A calm cooling effect on the skin will leave you looking forward to your next facial cleansing moment. SOURCES:
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